Friday, April 11, 2014

Tendency Toward the Complicated

On creating poetic forms:  In late 2010, I came across my first poetry challenge to invent/create a new form; I only truly began to explore form in mid 2010.  While a self-proclaimed free verse writer, I did come to notice that (the logical left side of my brain which dominates most of my day) liked to design pieces with structure.  And so I looked back at some of my writing until I unearthed a particular piece that I thought I could model a new form after.  Thus was born the Triquest (and approximately 3-5 variations on it...I have a tendency to overdue). 

By happenstance (I really just wanted to use the word happenstance), three months later I wrote a piece using one of my favorite poetic devices (repetition)...and then another and then another until I finally deemed it needed its own name (which I eventually changed).  I ended up settling on Nota as the name, though if you were to see its construction, one might think d'vile-nota might be a better name.  But I really was not 100% content with this because it was a 14-line poem, which made it feel too sonnet-ee for me (and I, forgive me, don't like writing sonnets...the whole meter and rhyme thing was never my forte...thus free verse).  And so in January of 2013 the Expanded Nota was formed. 

What I have learned in the process about me is that I am insane.  No seriously.  Recently, over at dVerse Poets Pub, a prompt was given (DIY) that asked the community to invent their own form (or a variation of an existing form).  And let me tell you, there are some very creative people out there...even those who typically don't work with form or have yet to explore it...created some really nice forms.  Not that I should be surprised...poetry and creative do tend to go together.  But what I learned is that I have a definite tendency toward the complicated.

And so, instead of sharing the intricacies of either form, I am just going to share examples of each here.  (Though those curious and/or as insane as I can find the details on each form and additional examples from the links provided above.)  The poems presented here were the first of their kind.  (I did not include variations of the Triquest, because as I mentioned that would be an additional 4-ish pieces...far more than the attentions span of a TenWord-er.)

On a side note:  The triquest has a quinzaine feel to it, though I had yet to meet the quinzaine form prior to writing my first triquest.  The nota has a definite pantoum and/or villanelle feel to it.



I wish for somebody (Triquest)

i wish for...
someone who can see me...
someone who can help me see me...
is that too much to ask?
how long do I have to wait?
is that someone even out there?

i wish for...
someone who will hold me...
someone whose embrace can ease the pain...
am i asking for a fantasy?
can i hope to find him soon?
does he even exist?

i wish for...
someone who will open himself up to me...
someone who can help me to open up...
is that more than i should want?
might he be in my near future?
is that someone real?

i wish for someone...
who will help me feel whole...
someone who will help me feel. 



Infinitely Delayed (Nota)

i can't afford to take this risky trip
deep within the recesses of my mind;
where sanity hangs on by just a thread
and the Fates' scissors do threaten to snip.

i can't contend with the fear that does bind--
paralyzing me from taking this flight
deep within the recesses of my mind.

my sanity hangs on by just a thread
and my tour guides are far from a delight.
how can i not fear what lay up ahead?

while the Fates' scissors threaten to snip,
how do i contend with the fears that bind--
when i do not know what lies up ahead?
i cannot chance taking this risky trip.



Embodying Her (Embracing Myself) (Expanded Nota)

she wades through my dreams just out of reach--
a dancer in the shadows of my grief.
I'm not sure how long she'll wait there for me
to realize the beauty I possess
while I struggle with a heart I can't breach.

Every once and again I catch a brief
glimpse of the person I'm supposed to be;
she dances in the shadows of my grief

bound to the darkness--longing to break free.
I wonder how long she'll wait there for me?
Full of pure love, she implores me to see

the amazing beauty that I possess--
dares me to embrace all that I should be
if I banish fear to love's sweet caress.

As I struggle with this heart I can't breach,
every once and again I feel a brief
ray of hope knowing she waits there for me.
Still I fear I'll never feel love's caress
for she wades through my dreams out of reach.


15 comments:

Brian Miller said...

ha a little insanity is not a bad thing...these are some pretty cool examples...i think that person is surely there...and hopefully you get the chance to meet them...someone to listen..be open...be there...yeah, i hear you...i think you would find many with that same longing...and i think in the second, sometimes it is the risk that gets us where we need to be...

Gabriella said...

Thank you for your explanations and for sharing your poems. I too like repetitions whether it is just one line or a whole stanza.

Heidi said...

Awesome introduction to your forms. I really enjoy forms that make poetry writing a puzzle to solve. (Except meter. I don't get meter.) I especially enjoyed the first poem. I think it was the use of repetition, which you used quite well. Excellent read!

bwfiction said...

I too enjoyed this

quest4peas said...

Thank you for sharing these three beautiful poems! They all convey a sense of longing...and I hope that you find (or have found) what you're looking for!

quest4peas said...

Thank you for sharing these three beautiful poems! They all convey a sense of longing...and I hope that you find (or have found) what you're looking for!

Marina Sofia said...

For someone who doesn't like form, you have done a great job of creating three forms and provided beautiful examples of each. You are right, there is a villanelle feel to the nota, especially the second, extended one.

Björn said...

Oh you are masterful in creating forms.. I have theory that creating free verse you still have to find some form or structure to it... It does not necessary you will use the same form again... (Which would make it a form) .. I like the way you have done all of them. And also great kudos to good names for them.

kelvin s.m. said...

Repetitions is one of the ingredients in my poetry too so i should like this. Really appreciate your patience & effort toward these fresh forms. kudos! & thanks for sharing it with us.. smiles.

Mary said...

You have come up with some fine forms here. And excellent examples of each. I like your Triquest. I am one who always likes to make use of repetition too. I wish for that someone for you too. And I liked the Nota form too. Trips inside are always a bit risky, but often the rewards will eventually make the risk worth while.

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

Very inventive!

Nathaniel C. Oliver said...

Free verse, to me, means only that you have a form that is unique to that poem - it doesn't mean "no form." For that reason, I think it is important for all poets to study form extensively and practice it thoroughly, even if they end up writing exclusively in free verse. Structure will, in time, become intuitive. I'm glad to see that you have coming up with your own forms, and I like complicated, too. A poem that can rise to the challenge of a complicated form is always a great thing to witness, and failing to rise to the challenge only teaches us how to better write the next poem. I have a personal goal (far from achieved) of writing at least one (good) poem in every form I can find.

Nice work here; I particularly like the repetition of "she dances in the shadows of my grief." You say that meter isn't your forte, but the iambs and anapests in that line would beg to differ.

Beachanny said...

I agree almost entirely with the post above. I couldn't have said it any better. I would have liked your particular breakdown - it surely wasn't a strict syllabic count but I did enjoy your examples. Thank you.

Victoria said...

Don't you think that most of us who write poetry are just a bit insane? And that, perhaps it is the poetry itself that keeps us able to function in this world? And even more, that the ability to complicate and then reduce to simplicity helps us to see many facets of life? I certainly hope so. Enjoyed both the poetry and the intro.

Victoria said...

Don't you think that most of us who write poetry are just a bit insane? And that, perhaps it is the poetry itself that keeps us able to function in this world? And even more, that the ability to complicate and then reduce to simplicity helps us to see many facets of life? I certainly hope so. Enjoyed both the poetry and the intro.